Sunday, November 14, 2010

Thanksgiving Science - Cranberries



While we had the cranberries out this week, I figured we might as well mix some science in with the baking.

First, we did a traditional sink, or float experiment, with a cranberry sized ball of play dough, and a cranberry.


They were pretty sure, from their pumpkin experience, that the berries float, because they are full of air. We cut one open, just to confirm their hypothesis.


Then, I placed the berries into a cake pan "bog"...


... so they could flood the field...



...and practice wet harvesting.



For follow up, we watched Dirty Jobs "Cranberry Farmer" (season 3, episode 11) on Netflix, visiting a cranberry farm in Bandon, OR, and following the craberries from the field through processing, and right into the jam jar.

We also found a fun British flick, on cranberry harvesting, and processing, on YouTube.

For more fun with science, be sure to check out this week's Science Sunday link-up, at adventures in Mommydom.

It's great to be a homeschooler.

13 comments:

Erin said...

Thanks so much for the information! We're making cranberry sauce tonight, so I can do a similar experiment, plus the Netflix tip was great! I just subscribed via Google Reader to your blog, and get better information each day, it seems!

pandora665 at yahoo dot com

littlewondersdays said...

We did something similar! I'll have to look for the netflix video.

Christy said...

Cool science! I'll have to do this.

Phyllis said...

I make a bog for my boys every year and they play there for quite some time. I love it. It is fun how you weave learning into your day's activities.

izzy said...

This is fun yet so educational! Thanks for sharing!

Ticia said...

Oh that is so fun! We need to do this

pebblekeeper said...

Growing up in Coos Bay, we visited Bandon often, as it is 16 miles south. Each year we would gather at the small farms and watch the harvest, then purchase huge ziplock bags of berries. It was always disappointing that these bright wet juicy berries were not sweet out of the bag! You'd just think they would be. There are a couple of homes of the ranches that are just the cutest! One is all pink. Watching them harvest and sticking your hand in huge crates of berries never gets old.

On a sauce pan - throw in as many berries as will fit, or as you'd like, pour in one jar of Apple Sauce - depending on if it is sweetened or not - pour in a 1/2 to a cup of sugar, sugar can be added later to taste.

Simmer on the stove all morning.

You can jar these in tiny jam jars for gifts. Add a drop or two of red coloring if you'd like it brighter.

:)

Debbie said...

We missed a field trip to the cranberry bogs. I hope to go next year.

Discovering Montessori said...

I love how you tie all your activities together so naturally. This looks like so much fun.Thank you for sharing.

Joyful Learner said...

We like Dirty JObs! Great experiment!

danita said...

sounds fun! i def. want to try this out!

Deb Chitwood said...

Great cranberry science activities! And I love the videos to go along with the hands-on part! I featured your post at the Living Montessori Now Facebook Page: http://www.facebook.com/LivingMontessoriNow

Anonymous said...

Thanks for a great springboard into cranberry science. I am an elementary science teacher in MA. The students started with "dry harvesting" from sand using a knife, fork or spoon. Next we did the "bounce" test and float test. Finally we flooded the farm and used the same tools/simple machines for the "wet harvest" season.
Grades K, 1, 2, and 3 LOVED this activity!